Results

Jul 7, 2015

Outstanding Young Alums

The NC State Alumni Association recognized two outstanding young alumni at its Evening of Stars gala. Award recipients Tony Caravano and Vansana Nolintha were Caldwell Fellows and both earned majors or minors in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Jun 2, 2015

As Go the Tropics …

Alumna Sandra Harding (Ph.D., Sociology ’94) asks a deceptively simple question: “Is life in the Tropics getting better?” But don’t be fooled by the simplicity of that question: her quest for the answer, and her leadership as an economic sociologist, stand to change the world. Harding, vice chancellor and president of Australia’s James Cook University, chairs the State of the Tropics, a first-of-its-kind partnership with 12 research institutions around the globe.

Feb 9, 2015

Student Profile: Marlaina Maddux

Marlaina Maddux, 2014 alumnus in Sociology, discussed her studies at NC State and the internship that led her to a full-time position as a campaign organizer for Environment Georgia.

Apr 28, 2014

The Trials of the Cherokee Were Reflected In Their Skulls

NC State forensic anthropologist Ann Ross and other researchers have found that environmental stressors – from the Trail of Tears to the Civil War – led to significant changes in the shape of skulls in the eastern and western bands of the Cherokee people. The findings highlight the role of environmental factors in shaping our physical characteristics.

Nov 26, 2013

A Circus Life

As a CHASS student in the 1970s, Bill Allen says his professors inspired him to travel the world trying to solve ecological problems. His wanderlust eventually turned to circus love. Allen is the executive director and producer for Cirque de la Symphonie, a performance company he co-founded in 2005 that blends the European circus tradition with symphony performances.

Sep 17, 2013

Face-to-Face: Skull Study Shows Variation of Pre-Columbian Cultures in Mexico

NC State forensic anthropologists have discovered that there were clear differences between indigenous peoples long before Europeans or Africans arrived in what is now Mexico. Their analysis of prehistoric peoples reveals significant regional variation. Contrary to long-held beliefs, all native peoples did not look alike.